3 Signs Your Ex Is An Emotional Bully (And How To Handle It)

Man drinking coffee, holding a cigarette and being an emotional bully.

Feeling beat up every time you talk to your ex? Don’t let them get to you anymore.

Do you feel drained after every conversation, text, or email with your ex? If so, you might be dealing with an emotional bully.

For most of us, divorce is already a very emotionally difficult time. We’re grieving the losses and loneliness. We’re afraid we’re not good enough and we even wonder if anyone will ever really love us.

Brené Brown says that the twin fears of ‘not being good enough’ and ‘fear of disconnection’ are at the root of shame. Leveraging these natural shame-based fears against us during divorce is exactly the tactic emotional bullies use.

Emotional bullies manipulate through shame and blame. They’re masters of creating even more misery during a time when we’re already vulnerable.

So, how do you know if your ex is an emotional bully? Here are three of their tactics (and how to deal with them):

  1. Nothing you do is ever good enough. Your ex makes statements like “… and you say you put the kids first,” “you should be ashamed of yourself,” and, “you never were any good at ____.”To deal with this type of bullying, you must do two things. First, remember you are always doing your best no matter what your ex thinks or says. Second, you can respond with either silence or you might say something like, “Interesting perspective, but I disagree,” and then (this is the hard part) leave it at that.
  2. They throw a fit when you don’t do exactly what they want, when/how they want you to do it. In this case, your ex is bullying you by using your fear of disconnection. I know this may sound weird, but if their fit throwing bothers you, then you actually do care what they think of you, and on some level you want connection with them.Dealing with this type of behavior requires that you accept that the divorce disconnected the two of you. It’s time to establish some healthy boundaries for yourself.
  3. Your ex acts like Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. You do one little thing they don’t agree with and they have a meltdown that’s completely out of proportion with the situation. But when you offer them any type of praise, they relax with happiness or visible satisfaction.This behavior exposes an emotional bully’s Achilles heel—They also have huge fears about feeling disconnected and not good enough. (Yup, deep down they harbour the same fears they’re preying upon. How ironic.) In fact, they probably feel inferior to you. Knowing this, you can use appropriate praise to defuse potential blow ups.

Of course, these tips seem easy to implement when you’re in a peaceful place reading them. But, I know that when you’re facing a bully, acting rationally isn’t always what happens. Most of us want to defend ourselves (or flee). Unfortunately, all both do is escalate or enable the situation.

The best long-term defense against an emotional bully is to bolster your self-esteem. The better you feel about yourself the less their behavior impacts you.

Feeling good about yourself means you won’t easily fall for your ex’s tactics of shame and blame, taking their bullying power away. If they can’t bully you, they’ll need to interact with you differently. Hopefully, that will (eventually) include respect.

I’m Dr. Karen Finn, a divorce coach and advisor helping people just like you who are dealing with the stress and pain of divorce. You can join my newsletter list for free weekly advice. If you’re ready to take the first step toward working with me as your personal coach, you can schedule an introductory private coaching session.

This article originally appeared on YourTango.

Feeling Heartbroken? 3 Ways to FINALLY Get Over Your Ex

Drowning your sorrows in Häagen-Dazs and Kleenex isn’t the only way to get over your ex.

Feeling heartbroken over the loss of a relationship colors the whole world a shade of gloomy gray. Misery and grief are all you can recognize. And although this is normal, it sure doesn’t feel that way. Most of us want to get over heartbreak as quickly as possible.

The key to getting through the gloomy, tear-stained grayness of your heartbroken existence is to go through it, to feel what you’re feeling, and to see your ex differently. Yeah, I know it’s much easier for me to say that than it is to do, so here are 3 steps you can take (and why you should take them) to get over your ex.

  1. Talk about your feelings; express yourself. The Huffington Post recently reported on some research Grace Larson did at Northwestern University. It turns out that it’s a good idea to talk about your ex.Specifically, she found that people who talked in an interview setting about their emotions made more progress than those who didn’t. It’s important to note that this talking wasn’t focused on problem-solving or blaming, but on perspectives. They would discuss things like when they first realized their relationship was going south and how the whole thing affected their views on romance.
  2. Accept that your ex isn’t the person you fell in love with. Life has a way of changing people over time. Maybe he didn’t change at all, but is just finally showing you who he really is. The person he has hidden from you. Either way, he’s not the same.It’s just a bit easier to let go of someone when you realize they’re not really who you fell in love with.
  3. Forgive your ex. OK, yeah, I know, this isn’t exactly what you want to hear, but there’s some pretty good research to indicate that this is one of the most important things you can do.

The Atlantic’s Olga Kazan wrote a piece called The Forgiveness Boost. The article suggests that making amends with those who trespass against us can yield both physical and mental benefits. For example, forgiveness can…

  • reduce one’s depression and anxiety levels
  • reduce negative emotions and stress
  • reduce negative physical symptoms associated with stress
  • reduce the number of medications used
  • improve sleep quality

But just HOW do you forgive someone? In the same article, Everett Worthington, a professor of psychology at Virginia Commonwealth University, suggests a 5-step process called “REACH” — Recall, Empathize, Altruistic Gift, Commit, Hold.

  • The first step is to recall your breakup including all of the emotions that go along with it.
  • The next is to empathize with your ex which is usually accomplished by realizing that they’re a fallible human being.
  • Then, you decide that you will forgive them and give them this altruistic gift of forgiveness.
  • After you make your decision, you commit to it by telling someone what you’ve decided.
  • Finally, you hold onto forgiveness by reminding yourself that you’ve forgiven them every time your feelings of hurt and anger resurface.

Most people approach heartbreak with a box of tissues and a gallon of ice cream. But, if you’ll give these three steps a try too, you’ll heal your broken heart much more quickly.

I’m Dr. Karen Finn, a divorce coach and advisor helping people just like you who are dealing with the stress and pain of divorce. You can join my newsletter list for free weekly advice. And if you’re interested in taking the first step toward working with me, you can schedule an introductory private coaching session.